This Qur’an can either be your blessed reward, or it can become your unexpected burden

Abu Musa Al-Ash’ari said:

إن هذا القرآن كائن لكم أجرا، وكائن عليكم وزرا، فاتبعوا القرآن و لا يتبعنكم القرآن ! فإنه من اتبع القرآن هبط به على رياض الجنة ومن تبعه القرآن زخ في قفاه، فقذفه في النار

“This Qur’an can either be your blessed reward, or it can become your unexpected burden on the day of reckoning. Follow the Qur’an and do not let the Qur’an follow you! For whosoever follows the Qur’an, it will lead him to the blissful gardens of janna, and whosoever is followed by the Qur’an, it will chase him and force him until it shoves him into the abyss of hell-fire (naar al-jahannam)”.

[“Hilyat Al-Awliya”, 1/257].

Man Made Laws Vs Shariah, Ruling by Laws other than what Allah Revealed, Conditions and Ruling

This book appears at a time when many other books and ideas are being propogated to justify the status quo of the ummah, and the position of those who are not ruling by what Allah has revealed and to detract from the seriousness of the situation.

This book is a detailed discussion of the extreme views of both the Murji’ah and Khawaarij, which are clouding the ummah’s vision as they have done for far too long. The view of the Murji’ah states that faith is simply the matter of belief in the heart, which no link to action, whilst the view of the Khawaarij is that any sin equals a mjor kuft act which puts a person beyond the pale of Islam. The author highlights these distorted views, then explains the middle way of Ahl as-Sunnah wa’l-Jamaa’ah, based on the Qur’an and Sunnah, where faith is composed of both belief and action, and it may increase and decrease; while sin does not necessarily equal a major kuft act, but there are some major sins which do consitute major kufr acts and put a person beyond the pale of Islam, such as ruling by something other than what Allah has revealed.

Once this idea is clear in the minds of ordinary Muslims, the Muslim ummah will not accept anything from their governments and rulers except shari’ah, to rule their lives, and they will realize that any other system or law is nothing more or less than kufr in disbelief and a deviation from Islam.

My Heart Became Attached: The Strange Journey of John Walker Lindh

 

What would cause an otherwise intelligent, well-educated, and, by all accounts, privileged Californian to forgo an easy life in the United States to struggle for survival in a land of strife and mortal danger? With this question in mind, journalist Mark Kukis retraces the personal and spiritual evolution of the most reviled American traitor since Lee Harvey Oswald. “My Heart Became Attached” provides a detailed biographical account of John Walker Lindh’s journey, beginning with his childhood in an affluent San Francisco suburb. Kukis then follows Lindh’s footsteps to Yemen, where he learned Arabic and radical Islam, and on through the wild hinterlands of Pakistan and Afghanistan. The journey culminates with the violent prison uprising at Mazar-i-Sharif.

While conducting research, Kukis achieved unparalleled access to major players in Lindh’s life. In Pakistan, Kukis found the militants from the jihad group that trained with Lindh in a Pakistani camp. Kukis also conducted several rounds of interviews with Lindh’s friend who initially settled him in an Islamic boarding school, with Lindh’s instructor there, and with fellow pupils in the hardscrabble Pakistani village where he studied the Koran before journeying into Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, Kukis interviewed Taliban soldiers who fought at Mazar-i-Sharif and General Dostum, warlord of the region. Ex-roommates, family members, and friends all contributed to Kukis’s research, resulting in the most thorough portrait available of the American Taliban.

 

Purification of the soul

 

For a number of reasons, this is a very important time to be writing a book of this nature. First, the concept of purification of the soul as a whole is and always will be central to the message of Islam and to the welfare of humans, both in this life and the Hereafter. Indeed, it was a main mission of the messengers and prophets themselves.

Second, there is a very strong need to shed light on the correct path of purification as delineated by the Quran and Sunnah- free of the foreign influence, deviations and heresies that have found their way into the realm of the religion and have caused a great deal of harm. The path described by the Quran and Sunnah is the only path that can result in a true purification of the soul. Indeed, it is the only path that is truly consistent with the purpose for which humans were created. Hence, any discussion of purification of the soul must rely heavily and exclusively on the Quran and Sunnah and what can be correctly derived from those two sources.

Third, many Muslims themselves are today being influenced by secular, materialistic psychology, leading them to neglect the spiritual side of humans and to ignore the guidance that Islam offers for the purification of the soul. This influence often occurs at a level wherein the person himself may not be completely aware that it is occurring.

Fourth, for some time now, there has been an Islamic revival spreading throughout the Muslim world. Upon closer inspection, it seems that this revival is somewhat tenuous and delicate, in the sense that for many Muslims it is more of an µemotional¦ phenomenon. In order for this revival to be truly successful and lead to what it needs to lead to, it must be guided by the comprehensive teachings of Islam. First and foremost among those teachings is what is related to the purification of the soul. Without the purification of the souls, the revival will only be on the outer shell and will, in fact, be a “deceptive” revival, in the sense that the inner consciousness will not have been reformed and the lapse back to the pre-revival times may be very close at hand. Indeed, without the purifications of the souls, the very goals of the revival from the outset may be wrong.

 

Gore Vidal – American Empire

28 hours in the dark heart of Egypt’s torture machine

Rough justice: Egyptian plainclothes police officers arresting a demonstrator in Cairo. Hundreds of opponents of President Hosni Mubarak have been detained, protesters say. Photograph: Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images

The sickening, rapid click-click-clicking of the electric shock device sounded like an angry rattlesnake as it passed within inches of my face. Then came a scream of agony, followed by a pitiful whimpering from the handcuffed, blindfolded victim as the force of the shock propelled him across the floor.

A hail of vicious punches and kicks rained down on the prone bodies next to me, creating loud thumps. The torturers screamed abuse all around me. Only later were their chilling words translated to me by an Arabic-speaking colleague: “In this hotel, there are only two items on the menu for those who don’t behave – electrocution and rape.”

Cuffed and blindfolded, like my fellow detainees, I lay transfixed. My palms sweated and my heart raced. I felt myself shaking. Would it be my turn next? Or would my outsider status, conferred by holding a British passport, save me? I suspected – hoped – that it would be the latter and, thankfully, it was. But I could never be sure.

I had “disappeared”, along with countless Egyptians, inside the bowels of the Mukhabarat, President Hosni Mubarak’s vast security-intelligence apparatus and an organisation headed, until recently, by his vice-president and former intelligence chief, Omar Suleiman, the man trusted to negotiate an “orderly transition” to democratic rule.

Judging by what I witnessed, that seems a forlorn hope.

I had often wondered, reading accounts of political prisoners detained and tortured in places such as junta-run Argentina of the 1970s, what it would be like to be totally at the mercy of, and dependent on, your jailer for everything – food, water, the toilet. I never dreamed I would find out. Yet here I was, cooped up in a tiny room with a group of Egyptian detainees who were being mercilessly brutalised.

I had been handed over to the security services after being stopped at a police checkpoint near central Cairo last Friday. I had flown there, along with an Iraqi-born British colleague, Abdelilah Nuaimi, to cover Egypt’s unfolding crisis for RFE/RL, an American radio station based in Prague.

We knew beforehand that foreign journalists had been targeted by security services as they scrambled to contain a revolt against Mubarak’s regime, so our incarceration was not unique.

Yet it was different. My experience, while highly personal, wasn’t really about me or the foreign media. It was about gaining an insight – if that is possible behind a blindfold – into the inner workings of the Mubarak regime. It told me all I needed to know about why it had become hated, feared and loathed by the mass of ordinary Egyptians.

We had been stopped en route to Tahrir Square, scene of the ongoing mass demonstrations, little more than half an hour after leaving Cairo airport.

Uniformed and plainclothes police swarmed around our car and demanded our passports and to see inside my bag. A satellite phone was found and one of the men got in our car and ordered our driver to follow a vehicle in front, which led us to a nearby police station.

There, an officer subjected our fixer, Ahmed, to intense questioning: did he know any Palestinians? Were they members of Hamas? Then we were ordered to move again, and eventually drove to a vast, unmarked complex next to a telecommunications building.

That’s when Ahmed sensed real danger. “I hope I don’t get beaten up,” he said. He had good reason to worry.

We were ordered out and blindfolded before being herded into another vehicle and driven a few hundred yards. Then we were pushed into what seemed like an open-air courtyard and handcuffed. I heard the rapid-fire clicking of the electric rattlesnake – I knew instantly what it was – and then Ahmed screaming in pain. A cold sweat washed over me and I thought I might faint or vomit. “I’m going to be tortured,” I thought.

But I wasn’t. “Mr Robert, what is wrong,” I was asked, before being told, with incongruous kindness, to sit down. I sensed then that I would avoid the worst. But I didn’t expect to gain such intimate knowledge of what that meant.

After being interrogated and held in one room for hours, I was frogmarched after nightfall to another room, upstairs, along with other prisoners. We believe our captors were members of the internal security service.

That’s when the violence – and the terror – really began.

At first, I attached no meaning to the dull slapping sounds. But comprehension dawned as, amid loud shouting, I heard the electric shock rods being ratcheted up. My colleague, Abdelilah – kept in a neighbouring room – later told me what the torturers said next.

“Get the electric shocks ready. This lot are to be made to really suffer,” a guard said as a new batch of prisoners were brought in.

“Why did you do this to your country?” a jailer screamed as he tormented his victim. “You are not to speak in here, do you understand?” one prisoner was told. He did not reply. Thump. “Do you understand?” Still no answer. More thumps. “Do you understand?” Prisoner: “Yes, I understand.” Torturer: “I told you not to speak in here,” followed by a cascade of thumps, kicks, and electric shocks.

Exhausted, the prisoners fell asleep and snored loudly, provoking another round of furious assaults. “You’re committing a sin,” a stricken detainee said in a weak, pitiful voice.

Craving to see my fellow inmates, I discreetly adjusted my blindfold. I briefly saw three young men – two of them looked like Islamists, with bushy beards – with their hands cuffed behind their backs (mine were cuffed to the front), before my captors spotted what I had done and tightened my blindfold.

The brutality continued until, suddenly, I was ordered to stand and pushed towards a room, where I was told I was being taken to the airport. I received my possessions and looked at my watch. It was 5pm. I had been in captivity for 28 hours.

The ordeal was almost over – save for another 16 hours waiting at an airport deportation facility. It had been nightmarish but it was nothing to what my Egyptian fellow-captives had endured.

Later, I learned that Ahmed, the fixer, had been released at the same time as Abdelilah and me. He told friends we had been “treated very well” but that he had bruises “from sleeping on the floor”. I had flown to Cairo to find out what was ailing so many Egyptians. I did not expect to learn the answer so graphically.

Robert Tait is a senior correspondent with RFE/RL. He was formerly the Guardian’s correspondent in Tehran and Istanbul

• This article was amended on 10 February 2011 to remove references to electrocution (killing by electric shock). These have been corrected to ‘electric shock’.

 

http://www.readersupportednews.org/off-site-news-section/132-132/4904-28-hours-in-the-dark-heart-of-egypts-torture-machine

دعاء الشيخ جبريل – ميدان التحرير Sheikh Jebril Dua – Tahrir Square

Who is Abdul Hakim Gellani

 

Background information on Abdul Hakim Gellani:
• 45 year-old

• UK passport confiscated by Saudi authorities

• Re-arrested in 2007 without warrant or charge

Summary:
On 8 August 2007 Abdul Hakim Gellani, a British citizen and businessman of Yemeni heritage, was abducted by Saudi intelligence services from Al-Mordjane hotel in Mecca. He disappeared. On 25 September 2007, the Saudi authorities acknowledged his arrest but not his location. In February 2008, the government released a statement accusing him of money laundering. In August 2008, the Saudi authorities claimed that he “will be referred to the judiciary”. He has not been charged or tried, and his location is unknown.

Background:
Mr Gellani was first arrested by Saudi intelligence services at a hotel in Mecca after Hajj in November 2005. He was held for one year and eight months without charge or trial and subjected to severe physical and psychological torture. After attention from the British Consulate the tortured stopped, but he remained in prison. In May 2006, Mr Gellani began a hunger strike to protest his unlawful detention, hoping for release or at least charge or trial. He was released on 19 July 2006. He was never charged and has not appeared in court.

Mr Gellani was released on bail but Saudi authorities confiscated his UK passport so he could not leave or return home. His government “compensation” payment was stolen the day he was released. He obtained a new UK passport in Jeddah but this was also confiscated by Saudi authorities. Frustrated at the impasse, Mr Gellani’s wife arranged to relocate herself and their children, the youngest only a few months old, to Riyadh so they could be together until the situation resolved.

Aljazeera interview prompts re-arrest:
In May 2007 Mr Gellani was interviewed by Aljazeera. He discussed his experience of poor prison conditions, torture and UK passport confiscation. In July, Mr Gellani was talking by phone to his wife confirming the family’s imminent arrival in Riyadh when the security services re-arrested him, confiscated his phone and took him to an unknown location. The authorities denied any knowledge of him, stating that Mr Gellani “has not been arrested and was not being detained”. For the first three months, in apparent punishment for his criticism in the Aljazeera interview, he was kept in a tiny cell unable to stand.

Since then, Mr Gellani has been moved to three different prisons. He has not been charged or tried in over five years.

Impact on family:
British citizens in the UK, the Gellani family is devastated. On the day of his arrest, his mother had a stroke from the shock and remains chronically ill. Mr Gellani is permitted to call his wife and three children irregularly for about five minutes at a time, but close monitoring by guards means open discussion is not possible.

UN intervention:
On 15 August 2008 the WGEID submitted Mr Gellani’s case to the Government of Saudi Arabia. This has been ignored.

Join his Facebook Group
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Free-AbdulHakeem-Gellani/129092110486450?v=info
Br. AbdulHakeem Gellani has a court case coming up on the 9th January.
Please keep the brother in your Du’a’s.

Jazakum-Allah Khayran

Canadian Woman Converted to ISlam

Alcohol kills more than AIDS, tuberculosis or violence

 

GENEVA (Reuters) – Alcohol causes nearly 4 percent of deaths worldwide, more than AIDS, tuberculosis or violence, the World Health Organization warned on Friday.

Rising incomes have triggered more drinking in heavily populated countries in Africa and Asia, including India and South Africa, and binge drinking is a problem in many developed countries, the United Nations agency said.

Yet alcohol control policies are weak and remain a low priority for most governments despite drinking’s heavy toll on society from road accidents, violence, disease, child neglect and job absenteeism, it said.

Approximately 2.5 million people die each year from alcohol related causes, the WHO said in its “Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health.”

“The harmful use of alcohol is especially fatal for younger age groups and alcohol is the world’s leading risk factor for death among males aged 15-59,” the report found.

In Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), every fifth death is due to harmful drinking, the highest rate.

Binge drinking, which often leads to risky behavior, is now prevalent in Brazil, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa and Ukraine, and rising elsewhere, according to the WHO.

“Worldwide, about 11 percent of drinkers have weekly heavy episodic drinking occasions, with men outnumbering women by four to one. Men consistently engage in hazardous drinking at much higher levels than women in all regions,” the report said.

Health ministers from the WHO’s 193 member states agreed last May to try to curb binge drinking and other growing forms of excessive alcohol use through higher taxes on alcoholic drinks and tighter marketing restrictions.

DISEASE AND INJURY

Alcohol is a causal factor in 60 types of diseases and injuries, according to WHO’s first report on alcohol since 2004.

Its consumption has been linked to cirrhosis of the liver, epilepsy, poisonings, road traffic accidents, violence, and several types of cancer, including cancers of the colorectum, breast, larynx and liver.

“Six or seven years ago we didn’t have strong evidence of a causal relationship between drinking and breast cancer. Now we do,” Vladimir Poznyak, head of WHO’s substance abuse unit who coordinated the report, told Reuters.

Alcohol consumption rates vary greatly, from high levels in developed countries, to the lowest in North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and southern Asia, whose large Muslim populations often abstain from drinking.

Homemade or illegally produced alcohol — falling outside governmental controls and tax nets — accounts for nearly 30 percent of total worldwide adult consumption. Some is toxic.

In France and other European countries with high levels of adult per capita consumption, heavy episodic drinking is rather low, suggesting more regular but moderate drinking patterns.

Light to moderate drinking can have a beneficial impact on heart disease and stroke, according to the WHO. “However, the beneficial cardio-protective effect of drinking disappears with heavy drinking occasions,” it said.

One of the most effective ways to curb drinking, especially among young people, is to raise taxes, the report said. Setting age limits for buying and consuming alcohol, and regulating alcohol levels in drivers, also reduce abuse if enforced.

Some countries restrict marketing of alcoholic beverages or on the industry’s sponsorship of sporting events.

“Yet not enough countries use these and other effective policy options to prevent death, disease and injury attributable to alcohol consumption,” the WHO said.

Alcohol producers including Diageo and Anheuser Busch InBev have said they recognize the importance of industry self-regulation to address alcohol abuse and promote curbs on drunk drinking and illegal underage drinking.

But the brewer SABMiller has warned that policy measures like minimum pricing and high excise taxes on alcohol could cause more public health harm than good by leading more people to drink homemade or illegally produced alcohol.

(Editing by Laura MacInnis and Paul Casciato)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110211/hl_nm/us_alcohol

 

A brother aptly put it:

I was driving and noticed a large billboard that said it worse

that alcohol kills more teens than illegal drugs, shootings, suicides, accidents, etc COMBINED

and they wont make it illegal because its their rights, but they will give you a ticket for not wearing a seatbelt

does government really care about the health of its citizenry? or just what is convenient for corporate profits and municipality coffers?

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